Gluten Free Sourdough Discard Ideas

Gluten Free Sourdough Discard Ideas
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 
 
Discarding from your starter is optional, but it keeps the amount of starter manageable. The more starter you have, the more you need to feed it each time. Fermented bread is easier to digest, helps balance good bacteria in the gut and helps maintain healthy blood sugar levels. So, as you discard, you can reap those benefits in other recipes. 
Add 1/8-1/2 cup to your favorite recipes for pancakes, waffles, muffins, quick breads, cookies & pastries. Depending on how “sour” you want it to taste. 
Or make simple sourdough crackers:
  • 2/4 cup discarded starter
  • 2 T butter/coconut oil
  • 1/2 t sea salt +1-2t herbs of choice.
Mix dough & roll out thinly on parchment paper or baking stone. Sprinkle with sea salt. Bake at 325 degrees for 10 minutes. 
Remove from oven, cut into crackers. Return to oven for 20-40 minutes more depending on how thick your crackers are. 
Thicker crackers work well for dipping. 
Pizza crust
Sunday night is pizza night at our house. It’s also the one day during the summer Gertrude, my starter, typically gets fed. 
Take your starter out of the fridge and allow it to warm up to room temperature. I usually bring her out when we get home from church and set her on the counter. 
After lunch I mix her up and feed her equal parts gf flour and filtered water. How much I feed her depends on how many pizzas I need to make. Just keep the ratio 1:1 when adding and check the consistency. It should be cake like, but not as thick as brownies. 
When ready to bake. Place skillet or pizza stone in the oven and pre heat to 450. You want the skillet hot! I like to use my biggest cast iron skillet and make a Chicago style crust. If we’re having company and want a variety of pizzas, I’ll bring out the pizza stones. 
While the skillet is heating up, get your toppings ready. Hamburger, sausage, and breakfast pizza are all easy to assemble. 
Take the hot skillet out of the oven and spread oil on skillet. Carefully pour starter into the skillet. It should start cooking right away. Spread around to form the crust, sprinkle with salt, and spread oil over the top of the crust. 
Return to oven and cook for 5-10 minutes until firm, but not cracked. 
Take pizza out and add toppings. Then return to oven until cheese is melted. 
Cook a few minutes and then cut and serve. Now go have a pizza and move night!
 
Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Thriving Through Farm Distress: Wife’s Support Network! In our community, we embrace the challenges of farm life and provide a supportive space for wives facing the complexities of managing a family farm. Whether you're navigating financial pressures, day-to-day operations, or seeking ways to create a thriving home, we're here for you. Explore gardening tips for cultivating your own oasis, share insights on animal care, and discover practical family budgeting strategies. Together, let's grow through challenges, flourish authentically, and sow the seeds for a resilient and thriving farm life. Join us on this journey of resilience and abundance! 
 
As I've grown in my journey as an entrepreneur, mom, gardener, and livestock owner, I struggled to find a planner that met my needs and kept me organized. So, I MADE MY OWN. You can look at it on the link below and buy it on amazon below.
Don't want the whole calendar part? I got you! I pulled the gardening and animal care pages out and put them in a book all their own. 
 
Starting to garden doesn't have to be hard! I gathered all the tips I've learned over my gardening learning curve and made them into a simple course to jump start your gardening your life. 
 
Supporting Your Family Naturally from the Inside Out community!! This community is for Mommas, looking to Support Your Family from Nature for Wellness. Tips range from nutrition, herbals, detoxing, natural cleaning, and essential oils. Basically, all the things I’ve learned slowly over the past 5+ years of my journey. We have moved off Facebook, to better serve our community and be able to discuss openly options for providing for your family in the best way possible.
 
Join the FREE Community
 
I've had 3 very different pregnancies. After the first traumatic birth, I learned better and how to care for my body naturally and prevent common pregnancy and birth problems before they arise. This quick course will get you the tools you need to have a naturally healthy pregnancy, labor, and delivery. My first pregnancy I had a normal western medicine all the things pregnancy. My second? I flipped to completely natural, no medicine. Bonus: Preventing Preeclampsia Without the Aspirin & Healing from Birth Trauma

Classic Gluten Free Sourdough Bread Loaf

Classic Gluten Free Sourdough Bread Loaf
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 
 
Sourdough is all the rage but making it Gluten free has a special twist. It’s not a one-to-one conversion and takes a little extra care. Below is the classic Gluten Free Sourdough recipe I first learned and then have added modifications to make it work for my home. 
 
Build a levain/preferment. Read two options here, I typically use the jar method. 
Ingredients:
  • 320g warm filtered water
  • 10g psyllium husk
  • 15g maple syrup (or honey)
  • 150g active gf sourdough starter
  • 310g 1:1 gf flour blend 
    • I use fresh milled flour (oats and brown rice). If doing so, you will need to add starch (like potato starch). The ratio is 1/3 starch, 2/3 grain. For this recipe, it would be 206g milled grain, 103g starch. I buy my grains and starches from Azure Standard
  • 9g sea salt
Prepare your Dough:
  • Using a food scale, measure & combine the warm water, psyllium husk & maple syrup in a measuring cup or glass bowl and allow to gel. 
  • In a large mixing bowl, measure & combine your gluten free flour and sea salt.
  • Add your psylium mixture to the flour then mix in your active starter
  • Mix dough with a dough whisk, by hand, or in a stand mixer on low until dough comes together. If dough is still wet and sticky, add 1T flour at a time until dough comes together and is smooth.
  • Remove dough from bowl and knead on a lightly floured work surface and form into a round or oval shape.
  • Lightly flour or line your banneton or proofing bowl with a towel. Transfer your dough to the bowl with the smooth side down and any seams up
    • NOTE: If you are using a sandwich loaf pan, place seams down and proof your dough in the pan.
  • Cover with a tea towel and proof for 2 1/2 -3 hours at room temperature. 
    • If your house is cool, place it in the oven with light only on, or on a heating mat on the lowest setting, or a warm vent. 
    • You can also proof your loaf overnight in the refrigerator, which also helps develop a sourer flavor. 
  • Check your dough after 2 hours. If your dough has been proofing in the oven, remove it and carefully set aside do not disturb. Allow your dough to continue proofing 30-60 minutes more. Checking every 30 minutes. NOTE: the dough may not “double” while proofing but will. 
  • WHEN READY TO BAKE Place your dutch oven inside the oven and preheat to 425 degrees (this allows your dutch oven to get up to temperature. 
  • When your dough is proofed, turn dough out onto a folded section of parchment paper or dough sling from amazon (think of this as a sling that makes it easier to transfer to a hot dutch oven). Score your bread as desired, cutting in at least 1/4-1/2 inch - this allows steam to escape. Without scoring, your loaf will naturally crack. 
  • Remove hot Dutch oven from oven and carefully lower your dough into the dutch oven, careful not to drop which will deflate your bread and cause gumminess. Replace lid and place in oven. 
  • Bake for 45-50 minutes. After 45 minutes, remove the lid from the dutch oven Reduce temperature to 400 degrees and continue baking 35-50 minutes until golden brown on top. The exact time will vary depending on your oven and how golden you want your bread. When done, remove Dutch oven from oven and carefully remove loaf, using the sling.
  • Allow to cool completely before slicing- this is the hardest part, but worth it for the best texture. After slicing, store in a tea towel, linen bread bag or beeswax wrap on the counter for up to 2 days. 
NOTE: you can freeze the loaf whole for later use. 
Now enjoy your sourdough bread!
 
Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Thriving Through Farm Distress: Wife’s Support Network! In our community, we embrace the challenges of farm life and provide a supportive space for wives facing the complexities of managing a family farm. Whether you're navigating financial pressures, day-to-day operations, or seeking ways to create a thriving home, we're here for you. Explore gardening tips for cultivating your own oasis, share insights on animal care, and discover practical family budgeting strategies. Together, let's grow through challenges, flourish authentically, and sow the seeds for a resilient and thriving farm life. Join us on this journey of resilience and abundance! 
 
As I've grown in my journey as an entrepreneur, mom, gardener, and livestock owner, I struggled to find a planner that met my needs and kept me organized. So, I MADE MY OWN. You can look at it on the link below and buy it on amazon below.
Don't want the whole calendar part? I got you! I pulled the gardening and animal care pages out and put them in a book all their own. 
 
Starting to garden doesn't have to be hard! I gathered all the tips I've learned over my gardening learning curve and made them into a simple course to jump start your gardening your life. 
 
Supporting Your Family Naturally from the Inside Out community!! This community is for Mommas, looking to Support Your Family from Nature for Wellness. Tips range from nutrition, herbals, detoxing, natural cleaning, and essential oils. Basically, all the things I’ve learned slowly over the past 5+ years of my journey. We have moved off Facebook, to better serve our community and be able to discuss openly options for providing for your family in the best way possible.
 
Join the FREE Community
 
I've had 3 very different pregnancies. After the first traumatic birth, I learned better and how to care for my body naturally and prevent common pregnancy and birth problems before they arise. This quick course will get you the tools you need to have a naturally healthy pregnancy, labor, and delivery. My first pregnancy I had a normal western medicine all the things pregnancy. My second? I flipped to completely natural, no medicine. Bonus: Preventing Preeclampsia Without the Aspirin & Healing from Birth Trauma

How to activate a Gluten Free Sourdough Starter from a Dried Starter

How to activate a Gluten Free Sourdough Starter from a Dried Starter
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 
 
Starting a sourdough starter can be boosted along with a dehydrated starter. This acts as an inoculant to help the correct bacteria and yeasts to develop. Below are the instructions on how to rehydrate, build and grow your dehydrated sourdough starter. 
You’ll need:
  • Dried Starter
  • Brown Rice Flour*
  • Gluten-free Oat Flour*
  • Filtered Water
  • Basic Kitchen Scale
  • Spatula
  • Mason Jar or glass container with loose lid
  • Optional: Cheesecloth + rubber band (lid for jar)
*I use fresh ground brown rice and oats from Azure Standard. I have the grains pre-mixed 50/50 and grind it fresh through my KoMo mill. 
Day 1: Rehydrate Your Starter
Your packet contains 10 grams of starter. You can choose to use 5g or 10 g to get started. If using 5g, set aside the remaining 5g in a cool & dry place. 
Add 5g of your dried starter to a glass mason jar - pint size works well to start. After your starter is established, you can move to a bigger jar. Mine now lives in a glass crock from my great grandma. 
Add 25g of lukewarm filtered water to you starter - let sit to rehydrate. 
After 5 minutes, stir in 10g of brown rice flour and 10g of oat flour. Stir with spatula until well mixed. Scrape down the sides of the jar. 
Cover with cheesecloth & rubber band. Set aside at room temperature. 
Fun thing: Give your starter a name. 
Day 2: Feeding your Starter
Your starter will look smooth with minimal or no bubbles the first couple days, this is normal. 
No need to discard yet. Add 12.5g brown rice flour, 12.5g oat flour, and 25-30g lukewarm filtered water. Stir with spatula to combine and scrap the sides down. You want the consistency to look more like pancake batter. Cover and set aside at room temperature. 
Day 3: Feeding your Starter
You may or may not notice a few bubbles on the surface.
No need to discard yet. Add 12.5g brown rice flour, 12.5g oat flour, and 25-30g lukewarm filtered water. Stir with spatula to combine and scrap the sides down. 
Day 4: Feeding your Starter
You may or may not notice a few bubbles on the surface.
No need to discard yet. Add 12.5g brown rice flour, 12.5g oat flour, and 25-30g lukewarm filtered water. Stir with spatula to combine and scrap the sides down. 
During the next 24 hours, your starter may start to rise. Just for fun, mark the level of the starter on the side of the jar after mixing and watch how much it rises. Use a washable glass marker or a rubber band around the jar to mark it. 
Day 5: Feeding your Starter
Today we’re doing a bigger feed. The growing sourdough starter should smell really nice by now, like sourdough and yeast -similar to a brewery or bakery. That is an excellent sign she is getting stronger and can handle more food. 
NOTE: I you didn’t see much rise, consider adjusting the consistency. If it is too runny, it won’t rise well. Different types/brands of flour, humidity levels, etc. can lead to some variation between our starter consistency and your own. For example, sorghum flour is very dense and holds more water. If yours is on the more liquidy side reduce the water by 5-10g to start. 
Discard some starter. Remove all but 50g of the starter - you can use the discard in pancakes, muffins or to make crackers
Add 25g brown rice flour, 25g oat flour, and 50g of lukewarm water. stir with spatula to combine. Scrape down sides & cover. Note the level of the starter on the side of the container and set it aside. 
Continue with Maintenance Feedings
Moving forward, repeat step 5 and continue with daily feedings for the most active starter. This is best when you are making loaves of bread on a regular basis. 
Or you can switch to maintenance feedings 2-4x per week if you’re not using your starter often or going on vacation. Simply store your starter in the refrigerator. When you’re ready to use it again, bring it out to warm up to room temperature and resume feeding. 
Once your starter is established, feed her once a week for maintenance and keep her in the fridge between works. Allow the starter to come up to room temperature before discarding and feeding. This is my summer routine. 
If you want to change flour, do so over 3-5 feedings, mixing the old and new flour together. Otherwise, the sourdough will fall flat for a while until it rebuilds itself. I accidentally did this when I ran out sorghum flour and had to suddenly switch flours. It took several batches before she was bubbly again. 
Ready to Make Bread?
When your starter doubles in volume, you’re ready to make bread. 
This may happen between days 5-14. You can speed this along by placing the starter in the oven with only the light on for ambient heat. It may double in 3-4 hours
Feeding for Making Bread:
Prior to making bread, you may want to do 1-2 larger feedings depending on the volume of your starter. You can feed twice in a 12–24-hour period to increase activity if needed. 
Add 50g brown rice flour, 50g oat flour, & 100g lukewarm filtered water. 
How To Build Levain
First, feed your starter 1-2x in the 24 hours before making this recipe to ensure it’s good and active. You’ll know your starter is ready to use when it doubles in size. You can then do one of two options
  • If you want to use the starter right from your jar, do a big feeding of 75g gluten free flour of choice & 75g warm filtered water. This ensures you have at lease 150g of starter available with some left over. Allow to rise/double before making the recipe. 
  • Or build a levain/preferment: Building a Levain (also called a pre-ferment) helps determine how sour your bread will be, and also makes it easy to have the amount of starter needed for your recipe to add when needed. 
  •  
    • The amount needed will vary recipe to recipe, so see how many grams of active starter is needed. 
    • For the Classic GF Loaf recipe below, you’ll need 150g of active starter. 
    • In a second jar or bowl, add 50g of the fed & active sourdough starter, 50g GF flour, and 50g warm filtered water. Allow rise /double before using in recipe. 
 
Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Thriving Through Farm Distress: Wife’s Support Network! In our community, we embrace the challenges of farm life and provide a supportive space for wives facing the complexities of managing a family farm. Whether you're navigating financial pressures, day-to-day operations, or seeking ways to create a thriving home, we're here for you. Explore gardening tips for cultivating your own oasis, share insights on animal care, and discover practical family budgeting strategies. Together, let's grow through challenges, flourish authentically, and sow the seeds for a resilient and thriving farm life. Join us on this journey of resilience and abundance! 
 
As I've grown in my journey as an entrepreneur, mom, gardener, and livestock owner, I struggled to find a planner that met my needs and kept me organized. So, I MADE MY OWN. You can look at it on the link below and buy it on amazon below.
Don't want the whole calendar part? I got you! I pulled the gardening and animal care pages out and put them in a book all their own. 
 
Starting to garden doesn't have to be hard! I gathered all the tips I've learned over my gardening learning curve and made them into a simple course to jump start your gardening your life. 
 
Supporting Your Family Naturally from the Inside Out community!! This community is for Mommas, looking to Support Your Family from Nature for Wellness. Tips range from nutrition, herbals, detoxing, natural cleaning, and essential oils. Basically, all the things I’ve learned slowly over the past 5+ years of my journey. We have moved off Facebook, to better serve our community and be able to discuss openly options for providing for your family in the best way possible.
 
Join the FREE Community
 
I've had 3 very different pregnancies. After the first traumatic birth, I learned better and how to care for my body naturally and prevent common pregnancy and birth problems before they arise. This quick course will get you the tools you need to have a naturally healthy pregnancy, labor, and delivery. My first pregnancy I had a normal western medicine all the things pregnancy. My second? I flipped to completely natural, no medicine. Bonus: Preventing Preeclampsia Without the Aspirin & Healing from Birth Trauma

The Benefits of Using Tallow in Your Cooking

The Benefits of Using Tallow in Your Cooking
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 
 
Have you ever heard of tallow? It's that random thing on a beef carcass that most people tend to overlook. But did you know that tallow, or rendered beef fat, is actually really useful in cooking? For moms who have food allergies in the house and are wanting to save a few dollars, tallow might just become your new cooking friend. In this blog post, we'll explore the many benefits of using tallow in your cooking and baking.
 
Tallow is a perfect substitute for butter or oil. It has a high smoke point, meaning it won't burn easily, and it has a neutral flavor, making it versatile for use in both sweet and savory dishes. Whether you're sautéing vegetables, frying chicken, or baking biscuits, tallow can be used as a healthy and flavorful alternative to other cooking fats.
 
Tallow is a great source of nutrients. It is rich in B vitamins, vitamin E, and minerals like iron, zinc, and selenium. These nutrients are crucial for maintaining a healthy immune system, strong bones, and optimal brain function. By incorporating tallow into your cooking, you'll be adding a nutrient boost to your meals that may be lacking in other cooking fats.
 
Tallow is an affordable option. Because it's a byproduct of the meat industry, tallow is often available at a cheaper price than other cooking fats. This makes it a cost-effective option for families who are looking to save money on their grocery bills. Plus, since tallow has a longer shelf life than other fats, you can buy it in bulk and store it in your pantry for future use.
 
Tallow is easy to make at home. If you're up for a DIY project, you can make your own tallow at home by slow-cooking beef fat until it melts down into a liquid. You can get the complete directions here. I promise they are super simple. Making your own tallow not only saves money, but it also gives you control over the quality and source of your cooking fat.
 
Tallow is environmentally friendly. Unlike vegetable oils, tallow is a sustainable and eco-friendly option for cooking. By using tallow, you're reducing your carbon footprint and supporting the use of a renewable resource. Plus, since tallow is a natural product, it doesn't contain any of the harmful chemicals or additives that can be found in processed cooking fats.
 
Tallow may be something you've never considered using before in your cooking, but it's worth the try. Not only is it a healthy and versatile cooking fat, but it's also affordable, easy to make at home, and environmentally friendly. By incorporating tallow into your meals, you'll be adding a nutrient boost and a unique flavor to your dishes. So go ahead, give tallow a chance – it may just become your new cooking staple.
 
 
As I've grown in my journey as an entrepreneur, mom, gardener, and livestock owner, I struggled to find a planner that met my needs and kept me organized. So, I MADE MY OWN. You can look at it on the link below and buy it on amazon below.
Don't want the whole calendar part? I got you! I pulled the gardening and animal care pages out and put them in a book all their own. 
 
Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Farm Loss Support for the Farm Wife group! This group is for support and helping each other to move forward. This group is NOT for venting, bashing, or wallowing in pity. My goal is to help others who have been where I was looking at losing the farm or losing the farm and wanting somewhere to talk where people would understand.
This is NOT for staying stuck in the trenches. It IS for moving forward in life, with purpose and sanity. 
 
Starting to garden doesn't have to be hard! I gathered all the tips I've learned over my gardening learning curve and made them into a simple course to jump start your gardening your life. 
 
Supporting Your Family Naturally from the Inside Out community!! This community is for Mommas, looking to Support Your Family from Nature for Wellness. Tips range from nutrition, herbals, detoxing, natural cleaning, and essential oils. Basically, all the things I’ve learned slowly over the past 5+ years of my journey. We have moved off Facebook, to better serve our community and be able to discuss openly options for providing for your family in the best way possible.
 
Join the FREE Community
 
I've had 3 very different pregnancies. After the first traumatic birth, I learned better and how to care for my body naturally and prevent common pregnancy and birth problems before they arise. This quick course will get you the tools you need to have a naturally healthy pregnancy, labor, and delivery. My first pregnancy I had a normal western medicine all the things pregnancy. My second? I flipped to completely natural, no medicine. Bonus: Preventing Preeclampsia Without the Aspirin & Healing from Birth Trauma
 
For more on wellness tips click here:
 
For more on homesteading on your budget click here:

What do the milk labels mean?

What do the milk labels mean?
 
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 
 
A trip through the grocery store can be so confusing! So many labels anymore, on everything, but what do those labels really mean? Is the product really better or safer if it has a particular label? The past couple weeks I covered meat and eggs labels found in the store and break them down for you. This week I am covering milk labels. 
 
100% Grass fed –It means the animal has not been fed grain or grain byproducts and had continuous access to pasture during growing season. They are permitted to consume hay during the months grass is not growing (winter). This label is a challenge for dairy as meeting the nutritional requirements of the high producing cows on forage alone is difficult. 
 
RBST/hormone free – In 1994 a synthetic hormone was developed to boost cows milk supply called rBST. Today it is seldom used due to consumer demand, and the relatively low added return of milk, for the price of the drug. This label is highly controversial and not allowed in many states. 
 
Antibiotic free – This is a tricky label, as it is slightly miss leading. All milk is antibiotic free as far as residue. If a cow is given antibiotics for infection, her milk is dumped until the time residue is no longer found in the milk (withdrawal period). This label does not mean the cow producing the milk has never had antibiotics. So, it is essentially an extra label that means nothing. Pure marketing. 
 
Organic – In 2010 the regulations for USDA Organic became stricter. Currently, to be labeled organic, milk must come from cows fed feed of chemical fertilizers, pesticides or genetically modified plants, no added hormones or antibiotics. They mush have access to the outdoors throughout the year, pastured for at least 120 days per year, 30% of their diet from pasture grass. Cows also must have been in an organic environment for at least 12 months prior to the milk being sold as organic. Any cows given antibiotics must leave the herd within one year. 
 
Lactose free – This is a label that is growing in popularity due to the increase in people with food intolerances. Lactose fee milk or cheese or ice-cream, is dairy that has had the lactose taken out of it. Be aware however, lactose free does not mean dairy free! When dealing with dairy sensitivity, it may be the lactose or casein (2 proteins in found in dairy) causing issues. 
 
Ultra-pasteurized – This simply means the milk was heated to 280 degrees for a minimum of 2 seconds (compared to 161 degrees for 15 seconds for standard pasteurizing). This kills virtually all bacteria found in the milk, but also denatures many of the proteins and all enzymes. 
 
In many areas you can find small producers who will sell milk directly. Depending on the state you live in however, will determine how difficult it is to find and what you are able to buy. 
 
 
Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Courageous + Purposeful Mommas group! This community is for the Mommas, mommas to be, in the midst of raising, and kids grown, looking for tips on building your family up and providing for them through natural methods. Tips include: gardening, bulk buying, caning,/preserving, livestock, homesteading, and home remedies. Your family is precious, and this group is to help you gain the knowledge and tools to keep your family well and not reliant on outside professionals. Remedies and tips are easy and simple for the busy momma, time is precious after all, including pregnancy, birth, young kids, and illness. Trust your Momma gut again! This community offers the resources + community you need to help get started on your journey and prepare for whatever future you envision.
 
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Homemade canned Salsa

Homemade canned Salsa
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 

I love growing my own food. Part of growing all the food is not only eating it fresh in the summer, but preserving it for winter use. One vegetable we use for several canning recipes is tomatoes. I usually can salsa with many of the tomatoes. Its perfect for that side you forgot you needed to bring, or adding to chops or roasts. Making salsa is a simple process. 

For homemade salsa you will need (this will make approximately 3 quarts)
12 large tomatoes (approximately 1 cup each)
3 large onion
1 c vinegar (I like apple cider vinegar)
1 c Jalapenos chopped
½ c sugar
¼ c salt
¼ c cilantro (to taste)
4 cloves garlic
2 c corn (½ qt frozen)

I usually make 5 times the recipe and make as big of a batch as I can at one time. For the pot pictured the recipe is 3x. The smaller pot in the back will do 2x the recipe. 

You will need the following supplies:
Canning jars
Canning lids
Canning rings
Jar Funnel
Long spatula or knife
Hot water bath
Stock pot (I usually have at least 2)
Immersion blender (for smooth salsa texture)


Step 1. Quarter tomatoes and add all the ingredients to a big stock pot. Sometimes I don’t even quarter them. No need to remove skins or seeds. If you are using frozen tomatoes, just throw them in the pot. They will cook down and chop up as you stir the pot. 

Step 2. Add all the ingredients. As I harvest produce or find ingredients on sale, I will chop them up and freeze them in sizes I will need for the recipes. It makes the process so much faster. I also like to use fresh herbs if I have them on hand at the time (you will need about double the amount using fresh). Chop onions with a food processor saves your eyes and time too. Once everything is in the pot turn the burner on high and stir occasionally. 

Step 3. Stir the sauce and break up the chunks. I like to use my mix and chop for the first part to break up the big chunks. For a smoother sauce, use an immersion blender to blend everything together in the pot. 

Step 4. Once the sauce has boiled down to the correct consistency (this will be based purely on individual preference), pour into your cleaned and sanitized jars (running them through the dishwasher is an easy way to do this).

Step 5. Fill quart jars to ½ inch below the rim. 

Step 6. Run the rubber spatula up and down along the inside of the jar to remove any air bubbles. Add more sauce if needed. Wipe the rim clean. Do NOT forget this step. Jars with bubbles can explode in the water bath. Sauce on the rims will keep the jars from sealing properly. 

Step 7. Lids. Rinse the, one time use, canning lids in hot water. This is new compared to older lids which you needed to boil first. Then set them on the jar and attach the rings down. Do not over tighten the rings, a quick tight twist will do before you burn your fingers on the hot jar. 

If you are using reusable lids you will want to boil the seals and follow the instructions from the manufacturer. I purchased some from Tattler at www.reusablecanninglids.com


Step 8. Fill your spare pot (or now empty pot) half way with hot water and bring to a boil. If you have the stove space you can actually start the pot of water when you start cooking your sauce in the beginning (this also saves time). 

Step 9. Place jars in the pot, and cover with a lid to help it come to a boil quicker.

Step 10. Once boiling, set your timer for 25 minutes, and let it continue to boil (this is called Water Bathing)

Step 11. After the 25 minutes have elapsed, pull the jars out and set them on a doubled over towel on the counter. Listen for a small “pop” of the middle of the lid dropping down. This indicates that the jar is sealed correctly (for one time use lids). Let the jars cool completely. Check seals, remove rings, label, then store in your pantry.

For one time use lids, the bubble should be down and not pop up. For reusable lids, gently pick them up by the lid (it's terrifying the first few times), if the lid holds, the seal is good. 


Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Courageous + Purposeful Mommas group! This community is for the Mommas, mommas to be, in the midst of raising, and kids grown, looking for tips on building your family up and providing for them through natural methods. Tips include: gardening, bulk buying, caning,/preserving, livestock, homesteading, and home remedies. Your family is precious, and this group is to help you gain the knowledge and tools to keep your family well and not reliant on outside professionals. Remedies and tips are easy and simple for the busy momma, time is precious after all, including pregnancy, birth, young kids, and illness. Trust your Momma gut again! This community offers the resources + community you need to help get started on your journey and prepare for whatever future you envision.

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Homemade Canned Spagetti Sauce

Homemade Canned Spagetti Sauce
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 

I love growing my own food. Part of growing all the food is not only eating it fresh in the summer, but preserving it for winter use. One vegetable we use for several canning recipes is tomatoes. I usually can spaghetti sauce with many of the tomatoes. It makes for quick meals in the winter months and the kids love it. Making spaghetti sauce is a simple process. 

For homemade spaghetti sauce you will need (this will make approximately 3 quarts)
1 large onion
1 clove garlic
12 large tomatoes (approximately 1 cup each)
6 beef bouillon cubes (or 3 pints beef/bone broth)
4 t basil
2 lg bay leaves
1t salt
1 t oregano
12 oz can tomato paste
Optional mushrooms

I usually 3-5 times the recipe and make as big of a batch as I can at one time. For the pot pictured the recipe is 3x. The smaller pot in the back will do 2x the recipe. 

You will need the following supplies:
Canning jars
Canning lids
Canning rings
Jar Funnel
Long spatula or knife
Hot water bath
Stock pot (I usually have at least 2)
Immersion blender (for smooth sauce texture)


Step 1. Quarter tomatoes and add all the ingredients to a big stock pot. No need to remove skins or seeds. If you are using frozen tomatoes, just throw them in the pot. They will cook down and chop up as you stir the pot. 


Step 2. Add all the ingredients. As I harvest produce or find ingredients on sale, I will chop them up and freeze them in sizes I will need for the recipes. It makes the process so much faster. I also like to use fresh herbs if I have them on hand at the time (you will need about double the amount using fresh). Chop onions with a food processor saves your eyes and time too. Once everything is in the pot turn the burner on high and stir occasionally. 

Step 3. Stir the sauce and break up the chunks. I like to use my mix and chop for the first part to break up the big chunks. For a smoother sauce, use an immersion blender to blend everything together in the pot. 

Step 4. Once the sauce has boiled down to the correct consistency (this will be based purely on individual preference), pour into your cleaned and sanitized jars (running them through the dishwasher is an easy way to do this).

Step 5. Fill jars to ½ inch below the rim. 

Step 6. Run the rubber spatula up and down along the inside of the jar to remove any air bubbles. Add more sauce if needed. Wipe the rim clean. Do NOT forget this step. Jars with bubbles can explode in the water bath. Sauce on the rims will keep the jars from sealing properly. 

Step 7. Lids. Rinse the, one time use, canning lids in hot water. This is new compared to older lids which you needed to boil first. Then set them on the jar and attach the rings down. Do not over tighten the rings, a quick tight twist will do before you burn your fingers on the hot jar. 

If you are using reusable lids you will want to boil the seals and follow the instructions from the manufacturer. I purchased some from Tattler at www.reusablecanninglids.com

Step 8. Fill your spare pot (or now empty pot) half way with hot water and bring to a boil. If you have the stove space you can actually start the pot of water when you start cooking your sauce in the beginning (this also saves time). 

Step 9. Place jars in the pot, and cover with a lid to help it come to a boil quicker.


Step 10. Once boiling, set your timer for 30 minutes, and let it continue to boil (this is called Water Bathing)


Step 11. After the 30 minutes have elapsed, pull the jars out and set them on a doubled over towel on the counter. Listen for a small “pop” of the middle of the lid dropping down. This indicates that the jar is sealed correctly (for one time use lids). Let the jars cool completely. Check seals, remove rings, label, then store in your pantry.

For one time use lids, the bubble should be down and not pop up. For reusable lids, gently pick them up by the lid (it's terrifying the first few times), if the lid holds, the seal is good. 

Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Courageous + Purposeful Mommas group! This community is for the Mommas, mommas to be, in the midst of raising, and kids grown, looking for tips on building your family up and providing for them through natural methods. Tips include: gardening, bulk buying, caning,/preserving, livestock, homesteading, and home remedies. Your family is precious, and this group is to help you gain the knowledge and tools to keep your family well and not reliant on outside professionals. Remedies and tips are easy and simple for the busy momma, time is precious after all, including pregnancy, birth, young kids, and illness. Trust your Momma gut again! This community offers the resources + community you need to help get started on your journey and prepare for whatever future you envision.

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Homemade Pear Sauce without added Sugar

Homemade Pear Sauce without added Sugar
This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 

I love growing my own food. Part of growing all the food is not only eating it fresh in the summer, but preserving it for winter use. One of the things we were blessed with when we moved to our acreage was 2 pear trees! So of course I figured out how to make the most of them. One of the ways I found to use the pears and preserve them was to make pear sauce. Making pear sauce is a simple process. 

You will need:
Canning jars
Canning lids
Canning rings
Jar Funnel
Long spatula or knife
Hot water bath
Stock pot (I usually have at least 2)
Colander
Sieve/immersion blender/kitchen aid sieve attachment 
Pears

Step 1: Pick the pears while they are still green on the tree. This saves bruising when they fall off, and allows you to get the pears instead of the squirrels eating them all half way. Take them to a cool dark area and lay them out. I usually use an old sheet or boxes in the basement. Check on them every few days for those that are ripe. Mine turn from green to slightly yellow. 


Step 2: Once ½ to ⅔  are ripe that you (haven’t eaten), gently wash them up in the sink removing any bad spots. If you have the kitchen aid sieve attachment, you don’t need to core the pears. If not, peal, quarter, and core the pears. The sieve attachment is well worth the time saved. 

Step 3: Cook the pears. If you want to prevent darkening, dip pears in lemon juice or citric acid. I don’t mind the darker color, so I skip this step. When cooking I used my smaller pan that the colander fits into. This allows me to simply remove the pears, without having to fish them out of the water. Cook until the pears are soft and mushy. This is about 5 minutes. 

Step 4: Puree the pears by running them through the kitchen aid sieve, or using an immersion blender if you peeled and cord the pears. You could also use a food processor or blender


Any more white than this and you are loosing to much of the pear. Cook them a little longer to soften them. Peal and core should be the main thing you see coming out this end.

Step 5: cook the sauce down. Return the pear sauce to the stock pot, bringing to a simmer until desired consistency is reached. Stir the pot regularly to prevent sticking/burning the bottom. 

Step 6: Fill the jars! Fill hot jars leaving ½ inch headspace. 


Step 7. De-bubble the jars by running a long spatula or knife along the edge or the jar. Wipe the rim clean. Do NOT forget this step. Jars with bubbles can explode in the water bath. Sauce on the rims will keep the jars from sealing properly. 


Step 8. Lids. Rinse the, one time use, canning lids in hot water. This is new compared to older lids which you needed to boil first. Then set them on the jar and attach the rings down. Do not over tighten the rings, a quick tight twist will do before you burn your fingers on the hot jar. 

If you are using reusable lids you will want to boil the seals and follow the instructions from the manufacturer. I purchased some from Tattler at www.reusablecanninglids.com

If the jar is too hot to grab you can use a lid tighter as shown to help.


Step 9. Place jars (pint or quart) in a hot water bath. Wait for boiling and then set the timer for 20 minutes. 


Step 10. Remove jars from the hot water bath and allow to cool completely. Check the lids to make sure the jars are sealed. Remove rings, label and store. For one time use lids, the bubble should be down and not pop up. For reusable lids, gently pick them up by the lid (it's terrifying the first few times), if the lid holds, the seal is good. 
 

Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Courageous + Purposeful Mommas group! This community is for the Mommas, mommas to be, in the midst of raising, and kids grown, looking for tips on building your family up and providing for them through natural methods. Tips include: gardening, bulk buying, caning,/preserving, livestock, homesteading, and home remedies. Your family is precious, and this group is to help you gain the knowledge and tools to keep your family well and not reliant on outside professionals. Remedies and tips are easy and simple for the busy momma, time is precious after all, including pregnancy, birth, young kids, and illness. Trust your Momma gut again! This community offers the resources + community you need to help get started on your journey and prepare for whatever future you envision.

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How to can tomato sauce

How to can tomato sauce

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 

 

I love growing my own food. Part of growing all the food is not only eating it fresh in the summer, but preserving it for winter use. One vegetable we use for several canning recipes is tomatoes. I usually make a big batch of tomato sauce for cooking in the winter or make into salsa or spaghetti sauce if I run out before summer. Making tomato sauce is a simple process. 


You will need:
Canning jars
Canning lids
Canning rings
Jar Funnel
Long spatula or knife
Hot water bath
Big Stock pot
Sieve or Immersion blender
Tomatoes

 

Step 1. Pick the tomatoes or if you have them frozen pull them out of the freezer. Slice the tomatoes. I usually quarter them. No need to blanch or core, just throw them into the stock pot. 


 

Step 2. If the tomatoes are a bit firm, place them in a pot to steam for a bit. I have this nifty strainer that fits perfectly with my pot. My mom uses her big strainer and her big pot. Some people throw all the tomatoes in a pot and use an immersion blender to chop it all smooth. If you want that you can skip steps 2 & 3

 


Step 3. Run tomatoes through a sieve. Pictures 1 & 2 are how the rejects should look. Picture three the tomatoes are a bit firm yet and I’m loosing quite a bit of pulp, not just skin and seed.

Allow the juices to drop into a pot so they are ready to cook down. 

 

Step 4. Let the sauce cook down to the desired consistency. This step could take a while depending on how thick you like your tomato sauce. Just remember to stir the pot occasionally, so you don’t burn the bottom of the sauce. 

 

Step 5. Fill sterile jars leaving ½ inch head space. 

 

Step 6. De-bubble the jars by running a long spatula or knife along the edge or the jar. Wipe the rim clean. Do NOT forget this step. Jars with bubbles can explode in the water bath. Sauce on the rims will keep the jars from sealing properly. 

 

Step 7. Lids. Rinse the, one time use, canning lids in hot water. This is new compared to older lids which you needed to boil first. Then set them on the jar and attach the rings down. Do not over tighten the rings, a quick tight twist will do before you burn your fingers on the hot jar. 

 

If you are using reusable lids you will want to boil the seals and follow the instructions from the manufacturer. I purchased some from Tattler at www.reusablecanninglids.com

 

If the jar is too hot to grab you can use a lid tighter as shown to help.

 

Step 8. Place jars in a hot water bath. Wait for boiling and then set the timer for 20 minutes. 

 

Step 9. Remove jars from the hot water bath and allow to cool overnight. Check the lids to make sure the jars are sealed. Remove rings, label and store. For one time use lids, the bubble should be down and not pop up. For reusable lids, gently pick them up by the lid (it's terrifying the first few times), if the lid holds, the seal is good. 

 

Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Courageous + Purposeful Mommas group! This community is for the Mommas, mommas to be, in the midst of raising, and kids grown, looking for tips on building your family up and providing for them through natural methods. Tips include: gardening, bulk buying, caning,/preserving, livestock, homesteading, and home remedies. Your family is precious, and this group is to help you gain the knowledge and tools to keep your family well and not reliant on outside professionals. Remedies and tips are easy and simple for the busy momma, time is precious after all, including pregnancy, birth, young kids, and illness. Trust your Momma gut again! This community offers the resources + community you need to help get started on your journey and prepare for whatever future you envision.

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How to make taco seasoning at home

How to make taco seasoning at home


This post may contain affiliate links, which means that I may receive a commission if you make a purchase using these links, with NO additional cost to you. 


Have you looked at the back of those taco seasoning packets lately? One I recently looked at contained: Corn starch, maltodextrin, vegetable oil, silicon dioxide, citric acid, sugar, flavor. Many flavor packets also have MSG (mono-sodium glutamate). That’s not even the spices that just fillers! What is up with all that?!


Corn starch was ok. Citric acid and sugar I understood for preserving. But why the vegetable oil, silicon dioxide, and maltodextrin? MSG is a flavor enhancer that gets you addicted to the food. That pop, McDonald’s fries or ice cream you can’t put down? Yep there is MSG in there. MSG also can be an allergen for some. 


I was not ok with that. I didn’t even realize how much filler was in food seasoning until I started reading labels looking for food allergens. You would be surprised how much gluten and soy are in. 


The good news is I found a simple way to make taco seasoning at home without all the extra. Bonus is it has spices that are usually in the kitchen anyway. I mix it up in a batch about the size of the jar in the picture and use as we cook. We love tacos and Mexican food at our house, so it has never been old enough to begin caking. Just shake the jar before use and apply as much as desired.


For this recipe you will want to store it in an airtight glass jar. This will prevent it from caking better, especially if your spices live near the stove like mine. I can put two batches in my jar, but I layer them in so mixing is easier. I also add a little extra cumin, because my family likes it. 


Taco Seasoning

1 T chili powder 

¼ t garlic powder

¼ t onion powder

¼ t oregano

½ t paprika

1 ½ t cumin

1 t salt

1 t black pepper 

¼ t crushed red pepper



Wanting a community to lean into? Join the FREE Courageous + Purposeful Mommas group! This community is for the Mommas, mommas to be, in the midst of raising, and kids grown, looking for tips on building your family up and providing for them through natural methods. Tips include: gardening, bulk buying, caning,/preserving, livestock, homesteading, and home remedies. Your family is precious, and this group is to help you gain the knowledge and tools to keep your family well and not reliant on outside professionals. Remedies and tips are easy and simple for the busy momma, time is precious after all, including pregnancy, birth, young kids, and illness. Trust your Momma gut again! This community offers the resources + community you need to help get started on your journey and prepare for whatever future you envision.

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